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Core Section 1 of 4
1: Adhere to privacy and confidentiality legislation, regulatory requirements, and employer policies.
  • Respects patient privacy when communicating personal health information.
  • Maintains confidentiality, privacy, and security when sharing, transmitting, storing, and disclosing information (e.g., applying password protection on computer systems, obtaining consent to share and disclose information).
2: Recognize and manage professional boundaries.
  • Adheres to provincial regulations, standards of practice, guidelines, and Code of Ethics related to maintaining professional boundaries.
  • Seeks guidance in managing professional boundaries.
3: Recognize and manage ethically challenging situations.
  • Demonstrates integrity, accountability, respect, and sound ethics.
  • Applies critical thinking skills to manage ethically challenging situations.
  • Seeks guidance in identifying and managing ethically challenging situations.
  • Recognizes and manages potential, perceived, or actual conflicts of interest.
4: Work within personal and professional limits and seek assistance when required.
  • Assesses quality of services provided and identifies opportunities for improvement.
  • Demonstrates knowledge of professional scope of practice and professional responsibility as defined by legislation and jurisdiction.
  • Ensures the appropriate knowledge, skill, and judgement before performing activities or procedures.
  • Refers patients for consultation when conditions or concerns are beyond knowledge, skill, and/or judgement.
  • Seeks assistance to clarify professional scope of practice when necessary.
  • Obtains external feedback to support self-reflection.
5: Document patient care in either French or English.
  • Maintains records in accordance with professional standards of practice.
  • Retains records for the period of time required by the jurisdiction.
  • Facilitates timely access to and transfer of records and prescriptions to others according to legislation, regulations, and standards of practice.
6: Communicate appropriately, clearly, and effectively with patients, their family members or supporters, and healthcare providers.
  • Uses empathy and active listening skills.
  • Itemizes and rephrases choices to clarify needs.
  • Uses appropriate terminology when speaking with professionals.
  • Uses clear, patient-centred language when speaking with patients.
  • Considers patient’s age, culture, and capacity when communicating.
  • Provides information and instructions that are appropriate to the audience (e.g., the correct format, literacy level, and readability).
7: Use effective interpersonal skills to resolve conflicts and complaints.
  • Uses appropriate communication skills to resolve conflicts, such as active listening and reflection.
  • Demonstrates sensitivity to different opinions.
  • Develops viable options to resolve conflicts and complaints.
  • Seeks guidance when needed.
8: Engage with other members of the eye care team to best meet the patient’s needs.
  • Consults and seeks recommendations from different members of the team.
  • Takes into consideration and respects the opinions of others.
9: Understand patient expectations and aspirations and manage situations in which these cannot be met.
  • Conducts an assessment to determine the patient’s wants, needs, and knowledge.
  • Educates the patient based on the patient’s wants and the product’s limitations.
  • Identifies and manages escalating emotions.
10: Communicate the advantages and limitations of products to patients in a meaningful and clear manner.
  • Explains the limitations of eyeglass and contact lens designs to maximize patient success.
  • Explains the adjustment process for specific corrective lenses (e.g., progressive addition lenses) to promote successful adaptation.
11: Discuss with the patient systemic disease and its effect on the eyes.
  • Provides an explanation of the ocular impact of a particular disease, condition, drug, or treatment.
12: Demonstrate sound knowledge of current and emerging technologies used in practice.
  • Investigates and engages in regular training related to new products and technologies (e.g., software updates, new equipment and tools).
  • Advocates for resources that support advancement in technology.
  • Demonstrates knowledge of the retail optical business environment.
13: Prioritize duties when faced with a number of patients and competing demands.
  • Assesses patient needs and itemizes competing demands to prioritize them.
  • Considers all available options to manage the situation.
  • Ensures patient safety and strives to provide efficient service.
  • Communicates openly with patients and others involved.
  • Seeks guidance and assistance as required.
14: Recognize and implement infection control and prevention measures.
  • Ensures appropriate infection control signage is visible.
  • Enforces hand-washing by staff.
  • Disinfects lenses, tools, and instruments.
  • Demonstrates proper hygiene when serving patients.
  • Adheres to infection prevention and control measures established by jurisdiction and national regulatory bodies (Optical Laboratories Association, Health Protection Branch of Health Canada, and Canadian Safety Association).
  • Monitors changes in regulations and standards.
  • Implements procedures to react to an acute infectious disease outbreak.
15: Demonstrate a commitment to patient and workplace safety.
  • Engages in work safety training (e.g., WHMIS, fire drills).
  • Demonstrates knowledge of safety and material handling legislation.
  • Integrates safety practices into daily activities.
  • Advocates for changes when risks are identified by recommending interventions.
  • Monitors and responds to all vendor recalls and Health Canada alerts.
16: Understand the function of the instruments used for dispensing.
  • Demonstrates knowledge of operating equipment appropriate to practice (eyeglasses, contact lenses, or refracting).
  • Interprets instrument readings and applies knowledge to make decisions.
17: Demonstrate the appropriate depth and breadth of knowledge of anatomy and physiology.
  • Understands the visual pathway and anatomy of the eye.
  • Understands visual fields and the photochemistry of vision.
  • Understands pathology of the ocular system.
  • Understands the relevance of systemic diseases to eye health.
18: Apply current relevant ophthalmic theories using mathematical calculations to select appropriate eyewear.
  • Understands concave lenses, convex lenses, and prism.
19: Demonstrate problem-solving skills to correct any deficiencies related to the corrective lenses.
  • Examines corrective lenses and notes adjustments or repairs required.
  • Applies knowledge of various frame materials and their impact on the adjustment or repair.
  • Collects information from the patient to help determine root cause of problems.
  • Consults with other professionals when needed.
  • Teaches the patient proper care and maintenance of the corrective lenses to prevent future problems.
  • Explains to the patient normal adaptation to corrective lenses.
20: Evaluate resolutions to problems and integrate findings into practice.
  • Determines if a patient’s visual needs (work and leisure) are being met.
  • Considers feedback from others, through consultation.
  • Reflects on outcome and options considered.
  • Integrates new knowledge, skills, and attitudes into practice.
21: Engage in continuous learning.
  • Identifies resources and methods for keeping up to date on professional responsibilities (e.g., regulatory and association websites, journals, conferences).
  • Engages in continuing professional development.
  • Reflects on learning and how the new knowledge will influence practice.
  • Complies with provincial requirements to demonstrate ongoing competence.
22: Obtain relevant optical and health history.
  • Asks questions specific to lifestyle, including work and leisure needs.
  • Obtains previous prescription and optical history.
  • Obtains information about current medication use, health history, and family history.
  • Collects both objective and subjective information from the patient.
23: Determine environmental influences on vision, including lighting and setup of workstation.
  • Identifies ergonomics factors relevant to vision (e.g., computer distance and position, lighting, telephone/headset).
24: Apply knowledge of binocular vision to the dispensing of appropriate corrective lenses.
  • Demonstrates knowledge of eye anomalies and conditions requiring the use of contact lenses to maximize binocular vision.
  • Determines the presence of anisometropia or antimetropia resulting in aniseikonia.
  • Demonstrates knowledge of producing aniseikonic eyeglasses to balance retinal image sizes to maximize binocular vision.
25: Ensure measurements are taken accurately using approved devices and tools.
  • Calibrates equipment to ensure accuracy.
  • Ensures equipment is in good working order.
  • Ensures appropriate measurement techniques are followed.
26: Ensure all corrective lenses meet minimum recommended tolerances.
  • Applies standard tolerance chart.
27: Ensure manufacturers’ recommendations are followed as appropriate.
  • Considers wearing schedule limitations before dispensing.
  • Considers the power limitations of specific brands.
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